Nan Goldin Self Portrait in Blue Dress, NY 1985 SIGNED RARE

Nan Goldin Self Portrait in Blue Dress, NY 1985 SIGNED RARE
Nan Goldin Self Portrait in Blue Dress, NY 1985 SIGNED RARE
Nan Goldin Self Portrait in Blue Dress, NY 1985 SIGNED RARE
Nan Goldin Self Portrait in Blue Dress, NY 1985 SIGNED RARE
Nan Goldin Self Portrait in Blue Dress, NY 1985 SIGNED RARE
Nan Goldin Self Portrait in Blue Dress, NY 1985 SIGNED RARE
Nan Goldin Self Portrait in Blue Dress, NY 1985 SIGNED RARE
Nan Goldin Self Portrait in Blue Dress, NY 1985 SIGNED RARE
Nan Goldin Self Portrait in Blue Dress, NY 1985 SIGNED RARE
Nan Goldin Self Portrait in Blue Dress, NY 1985 SIGNED RARE
Nan Goldin Self Portrait in Blue Dress, NY 1985 SIGNED RARE
Nan Goldin Self Portrait in Blue Dress, NY 1985 SIGNED RARE

Nan Goldin Self Portrait in Blue Dress, NY 1985 SIGNED RARE
Nan Goldin - Signed Print and Magazine Set. Self-portrait in blue dress, New York City, 1985. Paper size: 5 x 7 inches. Image size: 5 x 7 inches. Open edition, previously available for 9 days only. Special signed print by Nan Goldin, accompanied by a copy of Aperture #239: Ballads, with proceeds going to benefit VOCAL-NY, P. This is a picture of me in the 80s at a friends after the bar. The dress was my uniform at that time.

These were the days of the night life. Proceeds from the sale of this print will benefit VOCAL-NY (Voices Of Community Activists & Leaders), P. (Prescription Addiction Intervention Now), and Aperture. N is my activist group fighting the Sackler family, whose pharmaceutical company, Purdue Pharma, developed and pushed OxyContin, igniting the Opioid Epidemic. We expose the Sacklers toxic philanthropy through direct action and court intervention, and we address the overdose crisis by advocating for Harm Reduction.

Were proud to collaborate with VOCAL-NY, a Black-led membership organization and one of the most influential activist groups on the ground. They organize low-income New Yorkers across the state to end the drug war, homelessness, mass incarceration, and HIV/AIDS, while also providing direct services to people who use drugs. Together, we fight to end the drug war and uplift the movement for Black lives. This special limited-edition print, Self-portrait in blue dress, New York City, 1985, comes with issue #239 of Aperture magazine, titled Ballads, which is dedicated to the enduring influence of Nan Goldins The Ballad of Sexual Dependency (Aperture, 1986). The issue features an exclusive interview with Goldin, as well as a section she curated dedicated to her influences across photography, film, and literature. (Prescription Addiction Intervention Now), a group organized by Nan Goldin, is committed to holding the manufacturers of the opioid crisis responsible and speaking for the hundreds of thousands of voices that have been silenced by the epidemic. VOCAL-NY (Voices Of Community Activists & Leaders) is a statewide grassroots membership organization that builds power among low-income people affected by HIV/AIDS, hepatitis C, the drug war, homelessness, and mass incarceration in order to create healthy and just communities. Nancy "Nan" Goldin (born September 12, 1953) is an American photographer. Her work often explores LGBT bodies, moments of intimacy, the HIV crisis, and the opioid epidemic. Her most notable work is The Ballad of Sexual Dependency (1986), which documents the post-Stonewall gay subculture and Goldin's family and friends. She lives and works in New York City, Berlin, and Paris. Goldin was born in Washington, D. In 1953 and grew up in the Boston suburb of Lexington to middle-class Jewish parents. Goldin's father worked in broadcasting and served as the chief economist for the Federal Communications Commission. Goldin had early exposure to tense family relationships, sexuality, and suicide, as her parents often argued about Goldin's older sister Barbara who ultimately committed suicide when Goldin was 11. This was in 1965, when teenage suicide was a taboo subject. I was very close to my sister and aware of some of the forces that led her to choose suicide. I saw the role that her sexuality and its repression played in her destruction. Because of the times, the early sixties, women who were angry and sexual were frightening, outside the range of acceptable behavior, beyond control.

By the time she was eighteen, she saw that her only way to get out was to lie down on the tracks of the commuter train outside of Washington, D. It was an act of immense will. Goldin began to smoke marijuana and date an older man, and by age 1314, she left home and enrolled at the Satya Community School in Lincoln. A Satya staff member (experimental philosopher Rollo May's daughter) introduced Goldin to the camera in 1968 when she was fifteen years old.

Still struggling from her sister's death, Goldin used the camera and photography to cherish her relationships with those she photographed. She also found the camera as a useful political tool, to inform the public about important issues silenced in America. Her early influences included Andy Warhol's early films, Federico Fellini, Jack Smith, French and Italian Vogue, Guy Bourdin and Helmut Newton. Both Goldin and Diane Arbus celebrate those who live marginal lives.

Stills from Variety are compared to Arbus' magazine work; the Variety series portray "the rich collision of music, club life, and art production of the Lower East Side pre and post AIDS period". Both artists ask to reexamine artists' intentionality. One of the reasons Goldin began photographing was Michelangelo Antonioni's Blow Up (1966). The sexuality and glamour of the film exerted a "huge effect" on her.

Referring to images shown in Ballad, the beaten down and beaten up personages, with their gritty, disheveled miens, which populate these early pictures, often photographed in the dark and dank, ramshackle interiors, relate physically and emotionally to the alienated and marginal character types that attracted Antonioni. The youths in Larry Clark's Tulsa (1971) presented a striking contrast to any wholesome, down-home stereotype of the heartland that captured the collective American imagination. He turned the camera on himself and his lowlife amphetamine-shooting board of hanger-ons.

Goldin would adopt Clark's approach to image-making. Please look at my other items including rare modern and contemporary art and design pieces. The item "Nan Goldin Self Portrait in Blue Dress, NY 1985 SIGNED RARE" is in sale since Tuesday, October 13, 2020. This item is in the category "Art\Art Photographs".

The seller is "ashbinx74" and is located in Bruton. This item can be shipped worldwide.
Nan Goldin Self Portrait in Blue Dress, NY 1985 SIGNED RARE